Posts Tagged ‘Paris’

The Blogger’s Soul

Posted: March 18, 2014 in Uncategorized
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The Blogger's Soul

Bearing your soul.
I just listened to a writer tell his audience, “What is there not to write about?”
life
Sunsets
Children
Cities
Love
Adventure
Families

As I sift through the people and places of my daily life, I find it is extremely important to listen.
We learn a lot.
Pastor said…
Joyce said…
My husband said…
My child spoke…

Some things I learned last week was that Denali National Park will not just let you drive through. They put people on school busses and chauffeur them through the amazing Alaskan tundra.
All caps of the word LORD in psalms reminds us of the Ia God Yahweh.
Mike crafted an eloquent phone call calmed down a customer and followed through on a pitch to crack a joke with John…no too funny, but ended up to make it an office sprinkle of fun to lighten up a heavy day.
She was tear-filled as she spoke of the riff between the two very close sisters. Hurting and sad. Needing to get this resolved.
He took a hurting widow with two small adorable redheads and began a family.
Jim at 82 married again. She is delightful and they are so much in love. I am very glad for him.
Thank you for a good week, Lord.
Thankful for your love and protection.
I love you.

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Ice on my Carousel

They are in several tourist places in Paris, like the Place Saint-Pierre in Montmarte, Jardin des Tuileries and Jardin du Luxembourg, but the most beautiful is the Eiffel Tower Carousel on the corner of the Pont d’Iéna and Quai Branly. What distinguishes this colourful carousel with white horses from any other in the world is the fact that it is right in front of the Eiffel Tower, giving an excellent opportunity for photographs.

November in Paris

November in Paris


Cold…don’t think so. Paris in November is wonderful. The tourist season is slow. You can sit outside at a cafe with a hot espresso and be warmed with a sidewalk musician and a bowl of French Onion soup.
Paris, anytime, is amazing.

The Boulevard Saint-Germain is a major street in Paris on the Left Bank (south side) of the Seine river. It curves in a 3.5 kilometer arc from the Pont de Sully in the east (the bridge at the edge of the Île Saint-Louis) to the Pont de la Concorde (the bridge to the Place de la Concorde) in the west and traverses the 5th, 6th, and 7th arrondissements. At its midpoint, the Boulevard Saint-Germain is traversed by the north-south Boulevard Saint-Michel. The boulevard is most famous for crossing the Saint-Germain-des-Prés quarter from which it derives its name.

The Boulevard Saint-Germain is a major street in Paris on the Left Bank (south side) of the Seine river. It curves in a 3.5 kilometer arc from the Pont de Sully in the east (the bridge at the edge of the Île Saint-Louis) to the Pont de la Concorde (the bridge to the Place de la Concorde) in the west and traverses the 5th, 6th, and 7th arrondissements. At its midpoint, the Boulevard Saint-Germain is traversed by the north-south Boulevard Saint-Michel. The boulevard is most famous for crossing the Saint-Germain-des-Prés quarter from which it derives its name.

Hardouin-Mansart’s Dôme des Invalides, Paris

On the north front of Les Invalides (illustration, right) Hardouin-Mansart’s chapel dome is large enough to dominate the long façade, yet harmonizes with Bruant’s door under an arched pediment. To the north, the courtyard (cour d’honneur) is extended by a wide public esplanade (Esplanade des Invalides) where the embassies of Austria and Finland are neighbours of the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs, all forming one of the grand open spaces in the heart of Paris. At its far end, the Pont Alexandre III links this grand urbanistic axis with the Petit Palais and the Grand Palais. The Pont des Invalides is next, downstream the Seine river. The Hôpital des Invalides spurred William III of England to emulation, in the military Greenwich Hospital of 1694.

Because of its location and significance, the Invalides served as the scene for several key events in French history. On 14 July 1789 it was stormed by Parisian rioters who seized the cannons and muskets stored in its cellars to use against the Bastille later the same day. Napoleon was entombed under the dome of the Invalides with great ceremony in 1840. In December 1894 the degradation of Captain Alfred Dreyfus was held before the main building, while his subsequent rehabilitation ceremony took place in a courtyard of the complex in 1906.
The building retained its primary function of a retirement home and hospital for military veterans (invalides) until the early twentieth century. In 1872 the musée d’artillerie (Artillery Museum) was located within the building to be joined by the musée historique des armées (Historical Museum of the Armies) in 1896. The two institutions were merged to form the present musée de l’armée in 1905. At the same time the veterans in residence were dispersed to smaller centres outside Paris. The reason was that the adoption of a mainly conscript army, after 1872, meant a substantial reduction in the numbers of veterans having the twenty or more years of military service formerly required to enter the Hôpital des Invalides. The building accordingly became too large for its original purpose. The modern complex does however still include the facilities detailed below for about a hundred elderly or incapacitated former soldiers.